Two-minute reviews

Ten Questions ?

dasavathaaram kamalhassan

Was it good?
Actually, It was better than good. It wasn’t just right there but this is probably what could be done, given the frantic screenplay.

Story?
Watch it, to believe it.

Screenplay?
Neat effort. Could have been better given that most of us have watched non-linear screenplays like Crash and Babel, firsthand from Hollywood. Nevertheless, a cool effort. Sujatha’s dramatic touches at various places.

Music?
uuuvey !!

Peformance?
Thoda 🙂 It’s a Kamalhassan film.

Favorite Performance ?

In the order of favorites- The CBI officer(amazing slang), Mottai Paati, Annaachi, Fletcher and so on until Avtaar Singh.

Dialogues ?
Brilliant at times, Egotripping at times. Could find traces of Sujatha and Crazy Mohan. I’m sure they have their contribution all over the place.

Worst ?
Kamal’s make-up fetish.

Best ?
Kamal playing the paati’s role with atmost ease, Poovaraagan’s Thirunelveli slang, Fletcher’s perfect American slang, screenplay and overall execution.

Anything else ?
Don’t decide about the movie right after watching it. Sleep over it. With a complex, sometimes confusing and not-to-so-logically exciting screenplay, to make a decision immediately wouldn’t be the right thing to do.

What the heck, let me say it, I liked it !!

Two-minute reviews

Borudi Nee Mohini

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Just like Santhosh Subramaniam, I haven’t seen the original Telugu version. But I couldn’t believe that Selvaraghavan can get so damn boring with his screenplays.

The first half of YNM literally begs for a good screenplay writer. It just drags and drags and starts to sleep midway. The second half of this family-romance is where they teach audience the proven effective ways of kaalai kadan.

The trio, Dhanush, Karthik Kumar and Nayan are boring thanks to their bad characterization and pathetic dialogues. Udit Narayan’s rendering of Yengeyo Paartha Nyabhagam and Nenjai Kasakki is sprinkled with bad Tamil pronunciation, though the songs are very tuneful.

The only good thing about the movie is that is starts very naturally and ends in a similar fashion. Everything in-between is a huge heap of mess. Tamil Cinema still awaits a realistic portrayal of a software engineer’s life.

Two-minute reviews

Pollathavan

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Original script wins. Pollathavan too. Except for a bad unrelated title(just to get some more rajinikanth fans to watch it) and some teeny weeny issues in screenplay, Pollathavan is one of the best scripts of the year. Like Gilli, it had a simple so-called-knot and no big missions to complete. Hence the screenplay moves seamlessly. Hats off to Vetrimaran(whoever he is), the director of this film.

The movie makes me believe that first-person narration is the most easy way to grip audience. Kakka Kakka proved it for the first time. And even more, Vetri Maran plays with two first person narratives in this flick. The narration juggles between protagonist and the villain, again seamlessly, in a interesting fashion. Loved every bit of it.

Unassuming cast, actual shooting spots (no sets), down-to-earth slang in dialogues, a well made climax stunt(after a long long time in tamil cinema) are the biggest strengths. Dhanush does a cake-walk. Except for some cliched expressions, Dhanush does a Kathal Konden again.

One of the best films of this year, don’t afford to miss it. Good luck to Vetrimaran !!

Two-minute reviews

Perfumaniac

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Perfume is passionately made, vividly colorful, sinfully sensuous but slightly slow and terribly long. An authentic book-to-screen story, directed by Tom Tykwer(Run Lola Run) and originally written as a hugely popular novel[Das Parfum] by Patrick Suskind.

It talks about a French orphan boy with a superhuman sense for smell. As he grows, he meets a perfume maker, displays his sense of smell talent, learns the art of perfume making but unfortunately turns into a schizophrenic. The ending has to be seen to be enjoyed.

The whole movie is crowded with amazing frame compositions, great cinematography and lovely BGMs. But what’s more attractive is the acute talent of the director to bring the sense of smell into the movie and still make the audience relate to it.

Ben Wishaw as Genouille, the passionate perfume maker is every man’s dream of following ones passion. Passionate enough to even turn into a solid schizo. As he runs behind the chariot in the final scenes, with a handful of “special” perfumes, one would understand his perfume passion. A career high role for Ben and he has done an amazing job of making the best of it.

Dustin Hoffman does a cameo as the perfume master. I wish someone else played the role. It didn’t fit him too well.

Even as the movie starts with the story ending, you know that it isn’t going to be the actual one. After a long wait of 2 hours and 15 minutes, the final scenes arrive and they are totally unbelievable, conceived and captured on camera extremely well. The whole movie rests in that final sequence and you can clearly see, a normal psycho movie turning into a beautiful one right at that moment. Good Experience.